Community Resiliency Model & Mindfulness


community Resiliency Model

The primary focus of this skills-based nervous system stabilization program is to reset the system’s natural balance.

 Teachers at Vance elementary practicing CRM skills

Teachers at Vance elementary practicing CRM skills

CRM (Community Resiliency Model) are scientifically based principles and practices studied and implemented by several teachers and staff through grants from the Asheville City Schools Foundation. The application of CRM tools have been found to have positive results for those who use them for personal and professional reasons and for both adults and children. 

Originally designed by TRI (Trauma Resource Institute) as a science based wellness initiative that provides a non-judgmental perspective on normal human reactions to stress and trauma.

The CRM skills help people understand their nervous system and learn to track sensations connected to their own well being, which CRM calls Resilience.

With practice, the nervous system begins to return to its normal balance (referred to as the Resilient Zone).

Using the wisdom of their own bodies, people experience rapid relief from symptoms accompanied by increased sense of control over future wellness.

ACSF has trained 16 ACS and ACSF staff to offer the Community Resiliency Model basic course. This course teaches the philosophy of CRM and the basic skills in a one-day course. Following the course, participants should be able to use the six wellness skills with community members (adults and children) and for themselves as self-care.

If you are interested in applying for a grant to further the work of CRM in your school, you can apply here through June 14th, 2018.


Mindfulness

Research shows that Mindful Based Stress Reduction is an effective method to combat stress and burnout.

 Students at Isaac Dickson Elementary Practicing Mindfulness through balancing.

Students at Isaac Dickson Elementary Practicing Mindfulness through balancing.

Cultivating mindfulness can have a significantly positive impact on physical health (improved immune function, healthier sleep, etc.), emotional balance (reduced anxiety, reactivity, etc.), and social connections (reduced feelings of isolation, increased compassion).

Moreover, evidence suggests that training attention in this way can help improve one's work performance (increased observational skills, improved concentration, productivity, decreased medical symptoms) and reduce professional burnout.

Previous grant studies have shown positive outcomes from using both CRM and Mindfulness to create a common language and school-wide approach, equipping students with self-awareness and self-regulation skills.

Explicitly teaching mindfulness practices in the classroom allows students living in poverty and/or students of color equitable access to academic instruction and positive social experiences.

If you are interested in applying for a grant to further the work of Mindfulness in your school, you can apply here through June 14th, 2018.